CALL FOR PAPERS

CERTIFICATE

IMPACT FACTOR 2019

Subject Area

  • Life Sciences / Biology
  • Architecture / Building Management
  • Asian Studies
  • Business & Management
  • Chemistry
  • Computer Science
  • Economics & Finance
  • Engineering / Acoustics
  • Environmental Science
  • Agricultural Sciences
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • General Sciences
  • Materials Science
  • Mathematics
  • Medicine
  • Nanotechnology & Nanoscience
  • Nonlinear Science
  • Chaos & Dynamical Systems
  • Physics
  • Social Sciences & Humanities

Why Us? >>

  • Open Access
  • Peer Reviewed
  • Rapid Publication
  • Life time hosting
  • Free promotion service
  • Free indexing service
  • More citations
  • Search engine friendly

Plagiarism Detection

IJCR is following an instant policy on rejection those received papers with plagiarism rate of more than 20%. So, All of authors and contributors must check their papers before submission to making assurance of following our anti-plagiarism policies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Serum biomarker analysis on clinical therapy study in severe traumatic brain injury Progesterone effect in modulating s-100b, aqp4 and il-6

Author: 
Mahyudanil, Bajamal A.H., Sembiring R.J. and Dharmajaya, R.
Subject Area: 
Life Sciences
Abstract: 

Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) consists of two processes primary injury and secondary injury. Secondary injury in TBI involves many factor of molecular and cellular responses to the primary impact. All of these factors culminate in cellular dysfunction and cell death via necrotic and more apoptotic. These downstream molecular and cellular processes in the secondary injury are the focus of many pre-clinical and clinical therapeutic studies. The spatiotemporal distribution of S-100B, IL-6, AQP4 productions in secondary injury are some key marker of acute feature after TBI pathophysiology. By examining changes of this protein in these processes, we can expect to identify novel approaches to TBI intervention. Hypotheticly, posttraumatic suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and an increase in cytokine-mediated peripheral aromatase activity, leading to an imbalance in sex steroid estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone serum levels, have been interest for precise understanding of that mechanisms involved. We treatment analyzed serum biomarkers (S100-B, IL-6, AQP4) as part of a randomize placebo-controlled of progesterone in patients with severe TBI (sTBI), and analyzed the long-term predictive value of these biomarkers on the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at 3 months. Method: This study was part of a prospective, outcome-assessor–and statistician-blinded, randomized, placebo- controlled trial of progesterone. The population age 15 – 60 years patients with severe TBI (sTBI), (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 4–8, who presented at our care trauma center, Central Hospital Dr Sutomo Surabaya within 24 hours after injury. We obtained approval from institutional ethics committee prior to the trial. Of 40 patients with sTBI, we serially analyzed 3 serum biomarkers S-100B, AQP4, and IL-6. We analyzed the long-term predictive value of serum biomarkers on dichotomized GOS score of 3 months. The serum levels of S-100B, IL-6, AQP4 were determined using a sandwich ELISA technique. The samples for the determination of these biomarkers were taken at the day I (24 hours), immediately after randomization and before Progesterone given intramuscular 1 mg/kgBW single dose, and then day IV (96 hours) later. Using IBM SPSS Statistic software version 22, analysis for 24 hours, 96 hours, and average serum biomarkers stratified according to outcome (The dichotomized GOS) was performed. Results: The serum levels S-100B, AQP4 and IL-6 were across the dichotomized GOS groups at 3 months in both groups. GOS 3 months maked two category: Poor outcome (label 1) for GOS score 1 – 3 and good outcome (label 2) for GOS 4 – 5. Binary logistic regression result showed all value biomarker significant model to prediction the GOS dichotomy. Analysis to prediction from good outcome to poor outcome (to right axis direction) we have the simulation equation. unfav. = X good - X poor. In the control group: S100B was increase, AQP4 was decrease and IL-6 no change. To analysis effect of progesterone as intervention group we found S-100B was extremely high increased that means progesterone indirectly can reduce neuronal injury. AQP4 and IL-S was decrease compare to control, that mean possibly progesterone have effect modulating up regulation in AQP 4 to inhibit neuroinflamation. Conclusion: Serial monitoring of S-100B, IL-6 and AQP4 serum levels could aid in prognostication in patients with sTBI. S-100B is the best good accuracy for predict outcome. Progesterone have an effect in change of S-100B serum level expression that involve in neuronal injury, and the process of cerebral edema (modulating AQP4 link to IL-6). However, in this study Progesterone had no benefit in overall clinical outcome (GOS dichotomy 3 months).

PDF file: 

IJMCE RECOMMENDATION

ONLINE PAYPAL PAYMENT

CURRENT ISSUE

NEWS

CHIEF EDITOR
Rosane Cavalcante Fragoso, Brasil
ASSOCIATE CHIEF EDITOR

   

Jean-Marc SABATIER
Chief Scientific Officer and Head of a Research Group
France

Advantages of IJCR

  • Rapid Publishing
  • Professional publishing practices
  • Indexing in leading database
  • High level of citation
  • High Qualitiy reader base
  • High level author suport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDITORIAL BOARD

Luai Farhan Zghair
Iraq
Hasan Ali Abed Al-Zu’bi
Jordanian
Fredrick OJIJA
Tanzanian
Firuza M. Tursunkhodjaeva
Uzbekistan
Faraz Ahmed Farooqi
Saudi Arabia
Eric Randy Reyes Politud
Philippines
Elsadig Gasoom FadelAlla Elbashir
Sudan
Eapen, Asha Sarah
United State
Dr.Arun Kumar A
India
Dr. Zafar Iqbal
Pakistan
Dr. SHAHERA S.PATEL
India
Dr. Ruchika Khanna
India
Dr. Recep TAS
Turkey
Dr. Rasha Ali Eldeeb
Egypt
Dr. Pralhad Kanhaiyalal Rahangdale
India
DR. PATRICK D. CERNA
Philippines
Dr. Nicolas Padilla- Raygoza
Mexico
Dr. Mustafa Y. G. Younis
Libiya
Dr. Muhammad shoaib Ahmedani
Saudi Arabia
DR. MUHAMMAD ISMAIL MOHMAND
United State
DR. MAHESH SHIVAJI CHAVAN
India
DR. M. ARUNA
India
Dr. Lim Gee Nee
Malaysia
Dr. Jatinder Pal Singh Chawla
India
DR. IRAM BOKHARI
Pakistan
Dr. FARHAT NAZ RAHMAN
Pakistan
Dr. Devendra kumar Gupta
India
Dr. ASHWANI KUMAR DUBEY
India
Dr. Ali Seidi
Iran
Dr. Achmad Choerudin
Indonesia
Dr Ashok Kumar Verma
India
Thi Mong Diep NGUYEN
France
Dr. Muhammad Akram
Pakistan
Dr. Imran Azad
Oman
Dr. Meenakshi Malik
India
Aseel Hadi Hamzah
Iraq
Anam Bhatti
Malaysia
Md. Amir Hossain
Bangladesh
Ahmet İPEKÇİ
Turkey
Mirzadi Gohari
Iran